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English Folk Songs from the Southern Appalachians: Comprising 122 Songs and Ballads, and 323 Tunes, with an Introduction and Notes: First Edition

by Campbell, Olive Dame; Sharp, Cecil J. [James]

First Edition

Price: $395.00
from: Yesterday's Muse, ABAA, ILAB, IOBA
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  • Seller Inventory #: 1310098
  • Format: Hard Cover
  • Book condition: Very Good
  • Jacket condition: No Jacket
  • Edition: First Edition
  • Binding: Hardcover
  • Publisher: G.P. Putnam's Sons / The Knickerbocker Press
  • Date published: 1917
  • Keywords: SONGS MUSIC APPALACHIAN FOLK SONGS ENGLISH APPALACHIA SOUTHERN MOUNTAINS NORTH AMERICAN ENGLAND BRITISH GREAT BRITAIN TRADITION TRADITIONAL

G.P. Putnam's Sons / The Knickerbocker Press, 1917. First Edition. Hard Cover. Very Good/No Jacket. First edition. Front hinge just beginning to weaken. 1917 Hard Cover. xxiii, 341 pp. 9 3/8 x 6 1/2. Original blue cloth, gilt titles & top page ridge. Map showing the position of the Southern Appalachians is present opposite title page -- the area spans Maryland, Virginia & West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, Alabama, Georgia, and South Carolina. Includes a wonderful bibliography of important works on folk music. ABOUT THE AUTHORS: Olive Dame Campbell (born 1882; died 1954) was an American folklorist. Born Olive Arnold Dame in West Medford, Massachusetts, she married John C. Campbell, American educator, in 1907. After his death, she co-founded and directed the John C. Campbell Folk School in Brasstown, North Carolina in 1925. Further, she helped in the formation of the Southern Highland Craft Guild. After a 1909 grant, she compiled Tennessee and Kentucky folk song lyrics with her husband. These were published in the seminal work, English Folk Songs from the Southern Appalachians by Cecil Sharp and Olive Campbell (1917, New York). Cecil James Sharp (22 November 1859 - 23 June 1924) was the founding father of the folklore revival in England in the early twentieth century, and many of England's traditional dances and music owe their continuing existence to his work in recording and publishing them. During the years of the First World War, Sharp found it difficult to support himself through his customary efforts at lecturing and writing, and decided to make an extended visit to the United States. The visit, made with his collaborator Maud Karpeles during the years 1916-1918, was a great success. Large audiences came to hear Sharp lecture about folk music, and Sharp also took the opportunity to do field work on English folk songs that had survived in the more remote regions of the southern Appalachian Mountains, pursuing a line of research pioneered by Olive Dame Campbell. Traveling through the mountains of Virginia, North Carolina, Kentucky, and Tennessee, Sharp and Karpeles recorded a treasure trove of folk songs, many using the pentatonic scale and many in versions quite different from those Sharp had collected in rural England. Generally, Sharp recorded the tunes, while Karpeles was responsible for the words. Sharp was greatly struck by the dignity, courtesy, and natural grace of the people who welcomed him and Karpeles in the Appalachians, and he defended their values and their way of life in print. Sharp's work in promoting English folk song dance traditions in the USA is carried on by the Country Dance and Song Society (CDSS). CONTENTS: Introduction; BALLADS: The False Knight upon the Road; Lady Isabel and the Elf Knight; Earl Brand; The Two Sisters; The Cruel Brother; Lord Randal; Edward; Sir Lionel; The Cruel Mother; The Three Ravens; The Two Brothers; Young Beichan; The Cherry-Tree Carol; Fair Annie; Young Hunting; Lord Thomas and Fair Ellinor; Fair Margaret and Sweet William; Lord Lovel; The Wife of Usher's Well; Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard; Barbara Allen; Giles Collins; Lamkin; The Maid Freed from the Gallows; Johnie Scot; Sir Hugh; The Gypsy Laddie; Geordie; The Daemon Lover; The Grey Cock; The Suffolk Miracle; Our Goodman; The Wife Wrapt in Wether's Skin; The Farmer's Curst Wife; The Golden Vanity; The Brown Girl; The Trooper and the Maid; In Seaport Town; The Cruel Ship's Carpenter; Shooting of His Dear; The Lady and the Dragoon; The Boatsman and the Chest; The Holly Twig; Polly Oliver; The Rich Old Lady; Edwin in the Lowlands Low; Awake! Awake; The Green Bed; The Simple Ploughboy; The Three Butchers; William Taylor; The Golden Glove; Pretty Nancy of Yarmouth; The Silk Merchant's Daughter; Jack Went A-Sailing; SONGS: The Rejected Lover; The Lover's Lament; The Dear Companion; The Rocky Mountain Top; The Warfare is Raging; The True Lover's Farewell; Katie Morey; Rain and Snow; The Wagoner's Lad; Come All You Fair and Tender Ladies; Ibby Damsel; Handsome Sally; William and Polly; Hick's Farewell; Poor Omie; The Virginian Lover; Early, Early in the Spring; Married and Single Life; Betsy; If You Want to Go A-Courting; Pretty Saro; My Dearest Dear; I'm Going to Georgia; Harry Gray; Locks and Bolts; William and Nancy; George Reilly; Johnny Doyle; Lazarus; Black is the Colour; The Single Girl; John Hardy; Betty Anne; My Boy Billy; Soldier, Won't You Marry Me?; Swannanoa Town; The Keys of Heaven; Putnam's Hill; The False Young Man; Pretty Peggy O; My Parents Treated Me Tenderly; The Sheffield Apprentice; The Broken Token; Wild Bill Jones; The Shoemaker; The Brisk Young Lover; Seven Long Years; Come All You Young and Handsome Girls; Loving Reilly; The Awful Wedding; Sweet William; Good Morning, My Pretty Little Miss; My Mother Bid Me; The Ten Commandments; The Tree in the Wood; NURSERY SONGS: The Farmyard; The Drummer and His Wife; The Bird Song; Sourwood Mountain; The Foolish Boy; Harm Link; Sing Said the Mother; I Whipped My Horse; A Frog He Went A-Courting; The Frog in the Well; The Carrion Crow; The Old Grey Mare; Notes; Bibliography; Index.